Human Trafficking Task Force Protocol Development Training Video Series

Human Trafficking Task Force Protocol Development Training Video Series

Video 1: What is a Protocol and Why is it Important?

Video 2: How Does a Task Force Develop a Protocol

Video 3: From Theory to Practice: Implementing Protocols

Why are protocols important for human trafficking task forces? How can a task force develop and implement protocols?  

The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), in partnership with ICF, introduces a three-part video series to promote the development of anti-human trafficking task force protocols by local law enforcement, prosecutors, and victim service providers across the United States. This training video series explains the various steps to developing anti-human trafficking task force protocols. The series is engaging and educational and encourages local law enforcement, prosecutors, and service providers to complete the tasks needed to create necessary protocols. The topics of the series include: 1. What is a protocol and why is it important? 2. How does a task force develop a protocol? 3. From theory to practice: implementing protocols. 

This video campaign includes a series of single-panel, full-color comics to supplement the training videos. Each cartoon features the topic in a fun or intriguing way. 

These materials are a part of IACP/OVC’s anti-human trafficking task force training catalog. This unique training series was developed with the help of Outside the Lines Creative group, LLC (otlcreativegroup.com), whose team is dedicated to creating fun, effective, and affordable cartoon solutions. 

These videos supplement IACP’s Anti-Human Trafficking Task Force Protocol Development Checklists

For more information, please contact the IACP Anti-Human Trafficking team at humantrafficking@theIACP.org or visit the IACP Anti-Human Trafficking Webpage.  

 

These materials were produced by the International Association of Chiefs of Police under Cooperative Agreement #2020-VT-BX-K002, awarded by the Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in these materials are those of the contributors and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice. 

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