Meet our Partners

Steven Marans, PhD, MSWis the Director of the NCCEV, Director of the Childhood Violent Trauma Center of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) at the Yale Child Study Center and Harris Professor of Child Psychiatry and Professor of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine. Throughout his career, Dr. Marans has focused on the experience of violent trauma in the lives of children and families, as well as building and developing systems of care that can improve services and clinical outcomes. As a leader in the development of the pioneering CD-CP program and a consultant on responding to CEV, nationally and internationally, Dr. Marans has helped agencies at the local, state and federal levels to identify and respond to thousands of children and families each year who have experienced violence in their homes, schools and communities. He has led the way in creating new collaborative responses to domestic violence and to psychologically-informed approaches to emergency management responses to mass casualty, man-made and natural disasters and has developed numerous products and materials for law enforcement and first responders related to CEV response. Dr, Marans has served on numerous national efforts related to CEV, is one of the founding members of the NCTSN and currently serves as a member of the U.S. Attorney General’s Defending Childhood Task Force. His work in developing acute, peri-traumatic and long-term responses to violent and catastrophic events has led to the development of new clinical approaches to meeting the needs of traumatized children and families, including Child and Family Traumatic Stress Intervention (CFTSI).

Email: steven.marans@yale.edu

 

Steven Berkowitz, MD is the Director of the Penn Center for Youth and Family Trauma Response and Recovery and of the Philadelphia In Home Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Service. He is an associate professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania’s, Perelman School of Medicine and an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Yale Child Study Center. As Medical Director and Deputy Director at NCCEV from 1999 to 2009, Dr. Berkowitz was a key figure in developing local law enforcement-mental health partnerships and consulting to developing partnerships nationally and internationally. With Dr. Marans and colleagues at the NCCEV, he developed many of the protocols and training programs used by CD-CP sites and is a co-developer of CFTSI with Dr. Marans. As Director of the Penn Center for Youth and Family Trauma Response and Recovery at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Berkowitz leads efforts within the City of Philadelphia to develop multi-disciplinary response to CEV. He provides consultation and training to the City’s Crisis Response Team and works closely with the Philadelphia Police Department’s Victim Service Officers. He also provides psychiatric consultation to the City’s Multidisciplinary Team for children who have been abused. Dr. Berkowitz received his medical degree from Hahnemann University School of Medicine and completed his residency in psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine.

Email: Steven.Berkowitz@uphs.upenn.edu

 

Chief Dean Esserman of the New Haven Police Department served as an Assistant District Attorney in Brooklyn, New York from 1983 to 1987. He went on to serve as a Special Assistant United States Attorney before serving as General Counsel to Chief William Bratton of the New York City Transit Police from 1987 to 1991. Chief Esserman was Assistant Chief of Police in New Haven, Connecticut from 1991 to 1993, where he put into effect a community-policing plan, the state’s first federally funded drug gang task force, and cut crime city-wide. He then became Chief of Police for M.T.A. Metro North Police Department, headquartered in New York City, serving from 1993 to 1998. Chief Esserman was appointed in 1998 as Chief of Police in Stamford, Connecticut. In 2002 Chief Esserman returned to New York City to join Thacher Associates. Later that year he was recruited as the Chief of Police of the City of Providence, Rode Island, where he served 8 ½ years until July 1, 2011. Dean Esserman is a graduate of Dartmouth College (B.A.), and New York University School of Law (J.D.), and holds a lecturer’s appointment at the Yale University Child Study Center. He is a member of the New York and Massachusetts Bar. He’s recently served as a Distinguished Professor at the Roger Williams University School of Law and School of Justice Studies. He presently serves as a member of the National Board of Vera Institute of Justice and the Local Support Initiatives Corporation (LISC) and also served as former board member of the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF). He is also a life time member of the IACP.

Email: desserman@newhavenct.net

 

Assistant Chief Luiz Casanova of the New Haven Police Department of Police Services. Assistant Chief Casanova has been active in law enforcement for 20 years and has worked in a variety of key positions in his 17 years with the New Haven Department. He has worked with a wide range of federal, state and local agencies, which has enhanced his knowledge of law, policies, procedures and management within the field of law enforcement. Assistant Chief Casanova is a Fellow of the CD-CP program and has been a consistent leader in program development, implementation and training in New Haven.

Email: lcasanova@newhavenct.net 

 

Hilary Hahn, EdM, MPH is the Project Director of the Childhood Violent Trauma Center and an Associate Research Scientist at the Yale Child Study Center. She will serve as content coordinator for the Yale team. Ms. Hahn has extensive experience managing multi-disciplinary collaborative research and product development projects. At the NCCEV, Ms. Hahn has acted as the national liaison for law enforcement-mental health collaborations, coordinating replication planning, training, technical assistance, data exchange and evaluation implementation in New Haven and at numerous replication sites across the country. She has extensive experience acting as a liaison between service systems to develop and implement data-sharing protocols in law enforcement and healthcare settings. Ms. Hahn has also overseen product development and dissemination, including reference and resource guides for domestic violence service providers and for first responders related to behavioral health issues of disaster and terrorism. Ms. Hahn has a Master’s in Policy and Administration from Harvard University and a Master’s in Public Health.

Email: hilary.hahn@yale.edu

 

Kristen Hammel, LCSW is the Clinical Coordinator of the Childhood Violent Trauma Center (CVTC) at the Yale Child Study Center. Ms. Hammel works closely with the New Haven Department of Police Services to implement the CD-CP program and s a member of the New Haven, Milford and Bridgeport Multi-Disciplinary Teams. Ms. Hammel has broad experience developing and providing training for law enforcement partners and has co-facilitated numerous trainings with law enforcement partners. She has extensive experience providing joint response with law enforcement to children exposed to violence in community settings, as well as trauma assessment and trauma-focused treatment. Ms. Hammel received her Master’s of Social Work from New York University and holds an undergraduate Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Connecticut with a concentration in Psychology and Criminal Justice.

Email: kristen.hammel@yale.edu

 

Colleen Vadala is the Assistant Administrator of the NCCEV and the Trauma Section at the Yale Child Study Center. She will assist the Yale team in collating and preparing materials and resources. Ms. Valada has more than 16 years experience supporting the development of law enforcement-mental health collaborations at Yale. Ms. Vadala has a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science and Psychology.

Email: colleen.vadala@yale.edu

 

Sarah M. Greene, ACSW, LCSW is the Director of Southeast Regional Training Center of the NCCEV in Charlotte, and Mecklenburg County’s Program Administrator of Trauma & Justice Partnerships. Ms. Greene is one of the founders of the Charlotte CD-CP program and was trained in replication of the model at Yale. Over the last sixteen years she has trained hundreds of police officers on childhood developmental trauma and the police-mental health collaborative response, as well as facilitated intensive Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training for over 400 officers on how to improve their responses to individuals experiencing a mental health crisis. Ms. Greene has provided consultation and training to law enforcement and mental health professionals representing multiple jurisdictions across the nation and assisted with facilitation of the annual NCCEV conferences. Ms. Greene received her Master in Social Work degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Email: sarah.greene@mecklenburgcountync.gov

 

Deputy Chief Eddie Levins is a 26-year veteran of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department in Charlotte, North Carolina. In 1997, Major Levins became involved in CD-CP and is an executive sponsor of this program, which has grown to serve thousands of children and families annually in Charlotte. Major Levins has trained officers and mental health specialists in jurisdictions across the nation in this model. He continues to serve the Charlotte community as an expert in the areas of police and mental health partnerships. Major Levins has a Bachelor’s degree from Appalachian State University.

Email: plevins@cmpd.org

 

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